Initiatives and Centers

BioXFEL

Biology with X-ray Free Electron Lasers is a consortium established in 2013 of eight U.S. research universities that addresses fundamental questions in biology at the molecular level. Using a recently-invented pulsed hard X-ray laser, our researchers can capture biological molecules in atomic detail, view their functional motions by taking brief snapshots, and observe interactions in their native environment. This opens up a new world to biology, to science, and to human health.

The Center for Biological Physics

The Center for Biological Physics at ASU conducts research into biological phenomena using the tools and methodologies of physics. Our interests span biomolecules, systems biology and cellular dynamics. Our faculty have expertise in a wide range of experimental, theoretical and computational methods. We collaborate widely on both basic and applied research questions - from the fundamental principles of life, to translational research in biomedicine. We have a vibrant interdisciplinary environment, centered in a dedicated and interactive physical space in the physical sciences building.

The Cosmology Initiative

The Cosmology Initiative at ASU bridges the School of Earth and Space Exploration and the Physics Department, two academic units in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and represents a major new national program. In the next few years, we anticipate building to over 20 faculty members whose research activities include experimental, observational and theoretical cosmology, creating one of the broadest and deepest cosmology programs in the country. In true ASU spirit, our top-notch research and teaching programs are matched by our vibrant outreach activities under the banners of the Beyond Center and the ASU Origins Project.

John M. Cowley Center for High Resolution Electron Microscopy

As a global leader in high resolution electron microscopy, ASU plays an important role characterizing critical properties of materials. This facility houses a dozen electron microscopes that can probe the physical, electronic and chemical structure of matter on an atomic scale. Instruments & techniques include Ion Milling; Electron Microprobe; Scanning Electron Microscopy; Transmission Electron Microscopy; Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy; and Aberration Corrected Electron Microscopy.

LeRoy Eyring Center for Solid State Science

The LeRoy Eyring Center for Solid State Science was established in 1974 on the premise that researchers at Arizona State University should have open access to sophisticated techniques for materials characterization. The center supports materials research across a broad range of scientific disciplines, including physics, chemistry, biological sciences, geology and engineering.